Discover the Enchanting Kiyomizu-dera Temple: History, Features, and Access.

In this blog post, we’ll explore the history, features, and access to Kyoto’s Kiyomizu-dera, a highly renowned attraction in the city.
Kiyomizu-dera stands out among Kyoto’s many landmarks, offering not only a glimpse into its rich history but also a chance to appreciate the surrounding picturesque nature.
Dive into this article to discover more about Kiyomizu-dera and consider planning a trip to experience its beauty firsthand.

Essential Information about Kiyomizu-dera Temple

Let’s start by checking out some basic information about Kiyomizu-dera Temple.

Kiyomizu Temple

  • Address: 1-294 Kiyomizu, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto City
  • Map: Google Maps
  • Access: 10-minute walk from the Gion bus stop (Buses 206 and 100)
  • Phone: 075-551-1234
  • Closed on: Open daily
  • Visiting Hours:
    • 6:00 AM to 6:00 PM (until 6:30 PM in July and August)
    • *Special evening admission (spring, summer, and autumn) until 9:00 PM
  • Admission Fees:
    • High School Students and above: 400 yen
    • Middle and Elementary School Students: 200 yen
    • (same rate for special evening admission)
  • Official Website: Kiyomizu Temple

The history of Kiyomizu-dera Temple

Let’s start by introducing the history of Kiyomizu-dera Temple.

Kyoto’s temples, with a history spanning over 1200 years

Located on the slopes of Mount Otowa in the eastern part of Kyoto, Kiyomizu-dera Temple was founded over 1200 years ago in 778 (Hōki 9).
It all began when the Nara-era monk, Kenshin, encountered the embodiment of Kannon (the goddess of mercy) in this area and was entrusted with creating a sacred site.

As a revered place dedicated to Kannon, Kiyomizu-dera has been embraced by the general public, with historical records documenting the enjoyment of pilgrimages by many people.
The vast 130,000-square-meter grounds house over 30 structures, including national treasures and important cultural properties.

Due to its rich history and valuable architecture, Kiyomizu-dera was designated as a “Cultural Property of Ancient Kyoto” in 1994 (Heisei 6) and inscribed as a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage site.

The name originates from natural springs.

The name of Kiyomizu-dera comes from a pure spring.
Kenshin traveled all the way from Nara to Mount Otowa because he had a dream instructing him to “seek clear springs to the north.”

Following the divine guidance, Kenshin headed north and discovered a waterfall with pure water on Mount Otowa.
There, an old hermit named Gyoei Koji was practicing asceticism in a thatched hut.

Gyoei Koji bestowed sacred wood upon Kenshin, instructing him to carve a “Senju Kannon statue” to protect this land.
After conveying this message, Gyoei Koji vanished. Kenshin, realizing Gyoei Koji was the messenger of the divine guidance and an incarnation of Kannon, followed his instructions.

Shortly thereafter, the warrior Tamura Maro came for deer hunting.
Kenshin explained the virtues of Kannon to Tamura Maro and admonished against taking life at the sacred site.

Impressed by Kenshin’s teachings, Tamura Maro erected a proper temple and named it “Kiyomizu-dera” after the pure water of the waterfall.
The source of the name, the “Otowa Waterfall,” remains a notable attraction at Kiyomizu-dera today.

Buildings from the Edo period are still standing today.

Many of the buildings at Kiyomizu-dera were constructed in the early Edo period. Throughout its history, Kiyomizu-dera has faced numerous fires, with records indicating at least nine instances of significant damage, some bordering on total destruction.

The most recent major fire occurred in 1629 (Kan’ei 6), during the early Edo period.
The reconstruction costs were covered by the third shogun, Tokugawa Iemitsu. With robust support from the shogunate, Kiyomizu-dera was splendidly rebuilt over approximately four years.

Since then, the temple has been fortunate to avoid major fires, allowing the buildings from about 400 years ago to remain standing in their original form.

The characteristics of Kiyomizu-dera Temple

The Connection to “Jumping Off the Kiyomizu Stage”

When it comes to Kiyomizu-dera, there’s a famous saying: “to jump off the Kiyomizu stage.”
It means “to make a bold decision.”
But why is Kiyomizu-dera associated with this proverb?
Let’s explore the origins of this saying.

What does the “stage” at Kiyomizu-dera refer to?

The “Kiyomizu Stage” refers to a balcony-like space at the main hall. It was constructed to offer traditional performing arts, such as Gagaku and Noh, as dedications to the Kannon deity located at the rear of the main hall.

The protruding stage hanging over the steep cliff provides a panoramic view of Kyoto, making it extremely popular among tourists.
In a time when tall buildings didn’t exist, it was nationally renowned as a symbol of towering architecture.

Jumping off such a high platform would require a truly daring spirit.
It’s easy to understand why people would coin the expression “to jump off the Kiyomizu stage” to capture the essence of the bold actions taken by people in the past.

Have people actually jumped off the stage?

The Kiyomizu Stage has only a low fence around it, making it relatively easy for anyone determined to jump off.
In fact, during the Edo period, many people did take the leap.

The reason for jumping was to make wishes.
The stage is about 13 meters above the ground, equivalent to the height of a four-story building, so jumping off posed a serious risk to life.

As a superstition developed that surviving the jump would make wishes come true, it became widely known.
Back then, the area below the stage was densely wooded, increasing the chances of survival for those who took the leap, but it was still a risky and daring endeavor.

According to records found at Kiyomizu-dera, 234 people jumped off the stage, and unfortunately, 34 of them lost their lives.
Since Kyoto Prefecture issued a prohibition order in 1872 (Meiji 5), there have been no more incidents of people jumping off the stage.

Points of Interest at Kiyomizu-dera Temple

Kiyomizu-dera boasts numerous important cultural assets, offering plenty of highlights to explore.
I’ll highlight some must-see points that you won’t want to miss.

The Kiyomizu Stage (Main Hall)

This iconic spot in Kiyomizu-dera is the main hall, representing the essence of the temple.
The building, equivalent to a four-story structure, features a grand stage that spans 13 meters in height, equivalent to 100 tatami mats. What makes this majestic structure even more remarkable is that it’s constructed using a traditional method called “Kakezukuri,” which doesn’t use a single nail.

Originally built as a platform for offering performances to the Kannon deity, this stage has hosted various traditional arts such as kabuki, sumo, and Noh performances.
Even today, during special ceremonies, the stage continues to witness performances dedicated to the divine.

The West Gate

Designated as an important cultural property, the vibrant-colored West Gate of Kiyomizu-dera attracts attention.
Originally lost in an early Edo period fire, the gate was reconstructed in 1633.
While it’s not accessible to pass through, you can appreciate its beauty from outside the fence.

The sunset over the western mountains viewed through the gate is stunning, making it one of Kyoto’s representative spots for evening sunsets.
Kiyomizu-dera’s West Gate is also considered a sacred place for “Nissokan,” the simplest form of meditation that involves contemplating the pure land while observing the sunset.
It is believed that anyone, regardless of time or place, can feel the presence of Buddha by contemplating the paradise during the tranquil dusk.

If you find yourself at Kiyomizu-dera in the evening, be sure to experience Nissokan by observing the sunset from the West Gate.

The Niomon Gate

When you visit Kiyomizu-dera, the first thing you’ll encounter is the main gate called Niomon.
Flanking the gate are colossal Niou statues, among the largest in Kyoto, standing guard over Kiyomizu-dera.
The gate is also known as the “Red Gate” due to its vibrant vermilion color, adding to its distinctiveness.

Standing tall at 14 meters with a width of 10 meters, this majestic gate has endured historical events, including destruction during the Ōnin War.
It was reconstructed in the early 16th century and underwent restoration in 2003, preserving its original features and grandeur.

As the front of Niomon is a popular spot for photography at Kiyomizu-dera, it tends to get crowded with tourists.
For the best photo opportunity, consider visiting during the quieter early morning or evening hours.

The Group of a Thousand Stone Buddhas

Lining the mountainside along the approach from Niomon Gate to Seishuin is a cluster of a thousand stone Buddhas.
Part of these diverse Buddhas were once worshipped in Kyoto’s town, but during the Meiji era’s anti-Buddhist movement, they faced abandonment until they were transported to Kiyomizu-dera.

Various stone Buddhas, including Jizo Bodhisattva, Kannon Bodhisattva, Amida Buddha, Dainichi Buddha, and more, stand in an array.
The vibrant aprons, skillfully replaced by dedicated individuals who continue the faith, add a delightful visual element.

Located slightly off the beaten path from the tourist thoroughfare, this collection has become a hidden gem within Kiyomizu-dera.
If you’re looking for a tranquil spot away from the crowds, it might be worth a visit.

The Keido Hall

Located beyond the West Gate, the Keido Hall is one of the largest halls within the precincts. It was built in 1633, designated as an important cultural property by the country.

Originally, during the mid-Heian period, it housed the complete Buddhist scriptures and served as a lecture hall where scholars from across the country gathered. The current Kodo Hall, however, is a reconstruction built in conjunction with the restoration after the Great Fire of Kan’ei. Inside the hall, you’ll find enshrined statues of Shaka Buddha, and one of the highlights is the ink painting of a circular dragon on the coffered ceiling, created by the Edo-period artist Okamura Nobumoto.

Every year on February 15th, the Nirvana Ceremony takes place here, featuring the unveiling of the treasured “Great Nirvana of Shaka Buddha” painting depicting the Buddha’s passing. It’s a special occasion where you can get up close to this usually unreleased artwork. If you’re interested, consider visiting during the Nirvana Ceremony for this unique opportunity.

The Waterfall of Otowa

The origin of Kiyomizu-dera and the namesake of the temple, Otowa Waterfall, is a significant feature. The water from this waterfall splits into three streams, known as “Golden Water” or “Longevity Water.” Each stream is believed to bestow blessings related to academics, romantic relationships, and health. It is said that if you scoop the water with a ladle and drink it, your wishes will come true.

In recent years, it has gained fame as a prominent power spot in Kyoto, attracting crowds of people seeking its blessings. Despite the queues, visiting Otowa Waterfall is worthwhile when you come to Kiyomizu-dera.

It’s considered proper etiquette to choose one of the three blessings when making a wish. It’s said that if you are too greedy and make multiple wishes, none of them will come true. So, take a moment to reflect on what you truly need before making your wish.

Zuigu-do

Zuigu-do, built in 1735, is a relatively newer structure within the premises of Kiyomizu-dera. Its name, “Zuigu,” is derived from the belief that the main deity, Daizuigu Bodhisattva, fulfills the wishes and desires of the people who visit.

The underground passage of the hall, known as “Taikai Meguri,” is famous. It represents walking through the inside of Daizuigu Bodhisattva’s belly in darkness. It is said that if you enter the passage, touch a stone inscribed with Sanskrit characters, and emerge, your wishes may come true. This concept is rooted in Buddhist philosophy, where the light at the exit, seen from the darkness, symbolizes guidance toward the fulfillment of prayers as a single ray of enlightenment.

Participating in Taikai Meguri requires an additional 100 yen, separate from Kiyomizu-dera’s admission fee. However, the experience is well worth the price, so be sure to give it a try.

Access to Kiyomizu-dera Temple

Let’s explore how to get to the Kiyomizu-dera Temple.
I’ll guide you on how to reach it from Kyoto Station and from other major tourist spots.

From JR Kyoto Station

Let’s start by explaining how to get from JR Kyoto Station to the Kiyomizu-dera Temple.

Access to Kiyomizu-dera Temple

Mode of TransportTravel TimeFare
Kyoto City BusAbout 30 min230 yen
Kyoto BusAbout 30 min230 yen
Walk + Keihan Train + WalkAbout 60 min150 yen
JR Train + Keihan Train + WalkAbout 50 min270 yen
TaxiAbout 15 min1,200-1,500 yen

You can get to Kiyomizu Temple by bus, train, or car. The travel time for each option is approximately 15 to 40 minutes, but it may vary depending on the traffic.
So, consider the above travel times as rough estimates.

Now, let’s take a closer look at each method of transportation.

Kyoto City Bus

A popular way to get from Kyoto Station to Kiyomizu Temple is by bus.
With seven different bus options, make sure not to get lost!

How to Get to Kiyomizu-dera Temple Using City Bus
Get Off at Bus StopsGojozaka Bus Stop or Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop
Bus StopKyoto Station Front “D1” or “D2” Bus Stop
Line/DestinationRoute 86, 106, 110, 206, Special 100, Special 206
Frequency86: Every 15 minutes
106: Every 30 minutes
110: Every 30 minutes
206: Every 8 minutes
Special 100: Every 10 minutes
FareAdults: 230 yen, Children: 120 yen
※”Subway and Bus One-Day Pass” and similar passes are accepted
DurationBus travel time: Approximately 30 minutes
※It’s about a 30-minutes walk from the bus stop to Kiyomizu-dera Temple.

After getting off at the nearest bus stop to Kiyomizu Temple, let me guide you through the specific route to the temple.

<Gojozaka Bus Stop>

  1. Upon exiting at Gojozaka Bus Stop, head east towards Higashioji-dori/Fu-do 143.
  2. Make a left turn to enter Higashioji-dori/Fu-do 143.
  3. Proceed 17m and make a right turn, then continue for 200m before making another right turn.
  4. After 450m, make a right turn, followed by a left turn after 93m.
  5. Take the next right, and in about 220m, you’ll arrive at Kiyomizu Temple!
    Since many people head to Kiyomizu Temple from this bus stop, you shouldn’t have trouble finding your way.

<Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop>

  1. From Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop, head south along Higashioji-dori/Fu-do 143, towards Matsubara-dori.
  2. Make a left turn onto Matsubara-dori and, after 600m, make a right turn, followed by a left turn after 84m.
  3. Continue for about 250m, and you’ll reach Kiyomizu Temple!

Along Matsubara-dori, you’ll find souvenir shops, allowing you to purchase souvenirs on your way to or from the temple.
By using Kyoto City Buses, you can explore various tourist spots, including Kiyomizu Temple.

Utilizing a one-day bus pass can make your sightseeing more economical and enjoyable.

Kyoto Bus

How to Get to Kiyomizu-dera Temple Using Kyoto Bus
Get Off at Bus StopsGojozaka Bus Stop
Bus StopKyoto Station Front “C3” Bus Stop
Line/DestinationRoute 18
FrequencyOnly at 14:50 on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays
FareAdults: 230 yen, Children: 120 yen
※”Subway and Bus One-Day Pass” and similar passes are accepted
DurationBus travel time: Approximately 30 minutes
※It’s about a 30-minutes walk from the bus stop to Kiyomizu-dera Temple.

One great advantage is that there’s only one bus stop, C3, making it easy to find!

The journey takes about 30 minutes, but the time may vary depending on the traffic.
The bus stop to get off at is “Gojozaka Bus Stop.”

Since the walking route is the same, refer to the map above for guidance!

Walk + Keihan Train + Walk

To reach Kiyomizu-dera by train, start by walking to Shichijo Station.
From there, hop on the Keihan train and head towards Kiyomizu-Gojo Station!

After getting off at Kiyomizu-Gojo Station, make your way to Kiyomizu-dera on foot.

  1. Walk from JR Kyoto Station to Shichijo Station on the Keihan Line.
  2. Take the Keihan train from Shichijo Station (towards Demachiyanagi) to either Kiyomizu-Gojo Station or Gion-Shijo Station.
    (Duration: 2 minutes / Fare: 150 yen)
  3. From Kiyomizu-Gojo Station or Kiyomizu-Shijo Station, walk to Kiyomizu-dera.

Sure, here’s a simplified version in English:

Let me guide you through the detailed route from JR Kyoto Station to Shichijo Station on the Keihan Line by foot.

To reach Shichijo Station from Kyoto Station, we’ll take a leisurely walk.
Follow the route below to find your way to the station.

Time Required: 15 minutes

Route:

  1. Exit from A-3 at Kyoto Station and cross Higashi-no-toin Street.
  2. Turn left at the building with okonomiyaki and Chinese restaurants.
  3. When you reach the major road, National Route 24, turn right.
  4. Walk straight, cross the Kamogawa River, and turn left at the intersection with McDonald’s.
  5. Arrive at Shichijo Station on the Keihan Line.

With few turns and plenty of landmarks, you should easily find your way to the station without getting lost.

Let me guide you through the detailed route from either Kiyomizu-Gojo Station or Kiyomizu-Shijo Station to Kiyomizu-dera!
Upon arriving at the nearest stations, Kiyomizu-Gojo Station and Kiyomizu-Shijo Station, you’ll continue your journey on foot.

Heading to Kiyomizu-dera from Kiyomizu-Gojo Station on Foot!

Time Required: Approximately 30 minutes
Route:

  1. Exit from Kiyomizu-Gojo Station in the direction of a shop called Granback.
  2. Walk straight, and when you see Higashiyama Gojo City Hall, turn left.
  3. When you reach the slope where you can see a rental kimono shop, turn diagonally to the right.
  4. Continue straight until you see a pottery specialty store; turn right into a narrow alley.
  5. Keep going straight, and when you see Chube Chaya, a tea house, turn left.
  6. Instead of taking the front staircase, turn right immediately and walk straight to reach your destination.

With many tourists around, you won’t have to worry about getting lost.
Enjoy the atmosphere of Kyoto and take a leisurely stroll to Kiyomizu-dera!

Heading to Kiyomizu-dera from Gion-Shijo Station on Foot!

Time Required: Approximately 30 minutes
Route:

  1. Exit Gion-Shijo Station and head towards Shijo Street.
  2. Pass through the entrance with Starbucks Coffee.
  3. Walk straight; when you see Yasaka Shrine, continue straight and enter.
  4. When you spot the Hyotan Pond, turn right on that path.
  5. Keep walking; when you see Basho-do, take a right at the end.
  6. Soon, you’ll reach a T-junction; turn left.
  7. Walk straight to a large intersection; continue straight.
  8. Follow the road; it will become a T-junction, so turn right.
  9. Once again, at a T-junction, turn left.
  10. When you come out near a chopstick shop, turn left.
  11. When you see a red building called Niomon, turn right.
  12. Keep going; when you reach a staircase, turn diagonally right and climb the stairs.
  13. Continue straight, and you’ll arrive at your destination.

If you want to enjoy the Kyoto atmosphere to the fullest, opt for this route.
It’s perfect for those who want to leisurely stroll through Kyoto’s unique narrow pathways and soak in the charm.

If you choose to travel to Kiyomizu-dera using the Keihan train, it will take approximately 60 minutes, and the fare is 150 yen.
It’s a cost-effective way to enjoy the atmosphere of Kyoto while leisurely exploring the path to Kiyomizu-dera.

JR Train + Keihan Train + Walk

If you’re heading to Kiyomizu-dera by train, you can use the JR (Japan Railways).

  1. Take the JR Nara Line (towards Nara) from JR Kyoto Station to JR Tofukuji Station.
  2. Transfer to the Keihan Line at JR Tofukuji Station and head to Keihan Tofukuji Station.
  3. Board the Keihan train at Tofukuji Station (towards Demachiyanagi) to Kiyomizu-Gojo Station or Gion-Shijo Station (Duration: 17 minutes / Fare: 270 yen).
  4. Walk from Kiyomizu-Gojo Station or Gion-Shijo Station to Kiyomizu-dera.

If you’re traveling to Kiyomizu-dera using JR, you’ll save about 50 minutes of walking to Keihan Shichijo Station.
This means a more comfortable journey, and you’ll reach your destination in approximately 50 minutes.

The fare for this route is 270 yen. Many people prefer this option as it involves only about 30 minutes of walking after getting off the Keihan train.
So, if you’re using trains for transportation, this route is often recommended!

Taxi

How to Get to Kiyomizu-dera Using Taxi
DistanceApproximately 4 km.
Fare1,200-1,500 yen
DurationApproximately 15 minutes

From Kinkaku-ji

When it comes to famous sights in Kyoto, Kinkaku-ji (the Golden Pavilion) tops the list. Now, let’s explore the route from Kinkaku-ji to Kiyomizu-dera.

From Kinkaku-ji to Kiyomizu-dera

Transportation OptionTravel TimeFare
Bus + Transfer at Kitaoji Bus TerminalAbout 60 min460 yen
Bus + Transfer at Rakuhoku High SchoolAbout 60 min460 yen
TaxiAbout 25 min3,200-3,500 yen

All the methods mentioned above involve traveling on roads, so the travel time may vary depending on traffic conditions. Please plan your departure with some extra time.

Now, let’s delve into the specific access methods!

Bus + Transfer at Kitaoji Bus Terminal

Let’s explore a convenient bus route with a transfer at Kitaoji Bus Terminal!

  1. Walk from Kinkaku-ji to Kinkakuji-michi Bus Stop.
    (Approximate time: 5 minutes)
    Simply head straight out from Kinkaku-ji.
    Turn left when you reach the main road, and you’ll find the bus stop right away.
  2. Take a city bus (routes 12 or 59) from Kinkakuji-michi Bus Stop to Kitaoji Bus Terminal
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  3. Transfer to another city bus (route 206) at Kitaoji Bus Terminal, heading to Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop.
    (Approximate time: 35 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  4. Walk from Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-dera.
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes)

Bus route 206 departs from Platform B.
The buses to Kiyomizu-dera run every 7 minutes, making transfers smooth and convenient.

Taking this route will take about 1 hour in total, and the fare is 460 yen.
It’s a convenient and affordable way to reach Kiyomizu-dera!

Bus + Transfer at Rakuhoku High School

To get to Kiyomizu-dera using a combination of buses, you can also transfer at Rakuhoku High School.
Be cautious because you’ll be changing to a different bus route at this transfer point!

  1. Walk from Kinkaku-ji to Kinkakuji-michi Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 5 minutes)
    Just head straight out from Kinkaku-ji.
    When you reach the main road, turn left, and you’ll find the bus stop right away.
  2. Take a city bus (route 205) from Kinkakuji-michi Bus Stop to Rakuhoku High School Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  3. Transfer to another city bus (route 206) at Rakuhoku High School Bus Stop, heading to Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 30 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  4. Walk from Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-dera
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes)

If you’re heading to Kiyomizu-dera using this route, the key point is that the bus ride is slightly shorter.
Other than that, there’s hardly any difference compared to going through Kitaoji Bus Terminal.
With a fare of 460 yen, it’s a recommended option for those looking to minimize travel costs.
The total travel time is approximately one hour.

Taxi

Access from Kinkaku-ji to Kiyomizu-dera Using Taxi
DistanceApproximately 10 km.
Fare3,200-3,500 yen
DurationApproximately 25 minutes

From Arashiyama

Let’s explore how to get from Arashiyama to Kiyomizu-dera.

From Arashiyama

TransportationDurationFare
Keifuku Electric Railroad Arashiyama Station + BusAbout 60 minutes440 yen
JR Saga Arashiyama Station + BusAbout 40 minutes470 yen
Hankyu Electric Railway Arashiyama Station + BusAbout 40 minutes450 yen
Bus + BusAbout 70 minutes460 yen
TaxiAbout 35 minutes4,000–4,500 yen

The travel times provided above are approximate, as they can vary depending on road conditions.
Now, let’s take a closer look at each transportation method mentioned.

Keifuku Electric Railroad Arashiyama Station + Bus

Let’s explore how to travel from Arashiyama to Kiyomizu-dera by transferring from the Keifuku Electric Railroad to a bus.

  1. Take a train from Arashiyama Station to Shijo-Omiya Station
    (Approximate time: 24 minutes / Fare: 220 yen)
  2. Walk from Shijo-Omiya Station to Shijo-Omiya Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 1 minute)
  3. Board a city bus (route 207) to Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 20 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  4. Walk from Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-dera
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes)

To get from the station to the bus stop, you just need to cross the intersection of Shijo-Omiya, a major street, and you’ll arrive on the other side.
It’s only a one-minute walk, so you don’t have to worry about getting lost.

Although the total travel time is approximately 60 minutes, the total fare is only 440 yen.
The advantage here is the ability to keep your travel costs low!

JR Saga Arashiyama Station + Bus

If you’re traveling from Arashiyama to Kiyomizu-dera by train and bus, you can use the JR (Japan Railways) service!

  1. From JR Saga Arashiyama Station to Kyoto Station
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes / Fare: 240 yen)
  2. From Kyoto Station, take a city bus (routes 86, 100, 110, 206) to Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 10 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  3. Walk from Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-dera
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes)

After taking a train to Kyoto Station, you can then travel to Kiyomizu-dera by city bus.
Since Kyoto Station has numerous bus stops, please be cautious not to get confused.

The total travel time is approximately 40 minutes, and the fare is 470 yen.
The relatively short travel time is a notable advantage.

Hankyu Electric Railway Arashiyama Station + Bus

This is a method of transportation using the Hankyu Electric Railway to Arashiyama and then taking a bus.

  1. Transfer at Katsura Station from Arashiyama Station.
  2. From Katsura Station to Kawaramachi Station
    (Approximate time: 16 minutes / Fare: 220 yen)
  3. Walk from Kawaramachi Station to Shijo-Kawaramachi Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 1 minute)
  4. Take a city bus (route 207) from Shijo-Kawaramachi Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 9 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  5. Walk from Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-dera
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes)

While there are one-time transfers each for the train and bus, you get to enjoy the scenery from the Hankyu Electric Railway.
The total travel time is approximately 40 minutes, and the fare is 450 yen.

Bus + Bus

Let’s explore the option of using only the bus to travel to Kiyomizu-dera.

  1. Take a city bus (route 28) from Arashiyama Park Bus Stop to Kyoto Station Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 43 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  2. From Kyoto Station Bus Stop, take a city bus (routes 206 or 100) to Gojozaka Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 17 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  3. Walk from Gojozaka Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-dera
    (Approximate time: 10 minutes)

The total travel time is 70 minutes, and the fare is 460 yen.
While the travel time is relatively long, you’ll have the opportunity to enjoy the view of Kyoto’s cityscape from the bus!

Taxi

Access from Arashiyama to Kiyomizu-dera Using Taxi
DistanceApproximately 15 km.
Fare4,000-4,500 yen
DurationApproximately 35 minutes

From Fushimi-inari Taisha

Let’s explore how to get from Fushimi-inari Taisha to Kiyomizu-dera.

From Fushimi-inari Taisha

TransportationDurationFare
Keihan Main Line (Keihan Electric Railway) + WalkAbout 30 minutes210 yen
JR Nara Line + BusAbout 30 minutes370 yen
Keihan Main Line (Keihan Electric Railway) + BusAbout 40 minutes440 yen
TaxiAbout 20 minutes2,500–3,000 yen

The travel times provided above are approximate, as they can vary depending on road conditions.
Now, let’s take a closer look at each transportation method mentioned.

Keihan Main Line (Keihan Electric Railway) + Walk

This is a method of traveling from Fushimi Inari to Kiyomizu-dera using the Keihan train and walking.

  1. Walk from Fushimi Inari Taisha Shrine to Keihan Main Line Fushimi Inari Station
    (Approximate time: 6 minutes)
    Exit Fushimi Inari Taisha Shrine and walk straight; you’ll find Fushimi Inari Station on your right.
  2. Take the Keihan Main Line from Fushimi Inari Station to Kiyomizu-Gojo Station
    (Approximate time: 6 minutes / Fare: 210 yen)
  3. Walk from Kiyomizu-Gojo Station to Kiyomizu-dera
    (Approximate time: about 15 minutes)

After leaving Fushimi Inari Taisha Shrine, head west for about 100 meters, then turn left onto Prefectural Road 119.
Make a right turn onto Prefectural Road 119, and after about 180 meters, you’ll reach Fushimi Inari Station!

The total travel time is around 30 minutes, and the fare is 210 yen.
Although you’ll need to walk for about 15 minutes from Kiyomizu-Gojo Station, the advantage is that you can keep your travel costs low!

JR Nara Line + Bus

Let me introduce you to a way to travel from Fushimi Inari to Kiyomizu-dera using JR Nara Line and a bus.

  1. Walk from Fushimi Inari Taisha Shrine to JR Inari Station
    (Approximate time: 1 minute)
  2. Take the JR train from Inari Station to Tofukuji Station
    (Approximate time: 2 minutes / Fare: 140 yen)
  3. Walk from Tofukuji Station to Tofukuji Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 3 minutes)
  4. Take a city bus (routes 202, 207) from Tofukuji Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 10 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  5. Walk from Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-dera
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes)

After leaving Fushimi Inari, head west towards Prefectural Road 119 to reach JR Inari Station.
Changing to the bus is also straightforward. When you exit Tofukuji Station onto Kujo Street, you’ll find a bus stop right across the street.

The advantage here is that you won’t have to worry about getting lost during the transfer.
The total travel time is about 30 minutes, and the fare is 370 yen.

Keihan Main Line (Keihan Electric Railway) + Bus

This is a method of transportation using the Keihan Main Line (Keihan Electric Railway) and a bus.

  1. Walk from Fushimi Inari Taisha Shrine to Keihan Main Line Fushimi Inari Station
    (Approximate time: 6 minutes)
  2. Take the Keihan Main Line from Fushimi Inari Station to Gion-Shijo Station
    (Approximate time: 8 minutes / Fare: 210 yen)
  3. Walk from Gion-Shijo Station to Shijo-Keihanmae Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 1 minute)
  4. Take a city bus (routes 86, 207) from Shijo-Keihanmae Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop
    (Approximate time: 10 minutes / Fare: 230 yen)
  5. Walk from Kiyomizu-michi Bus Stop to Kiyomizu-dera
    (Approximate time: 15 minutes)

From Fushimi Inari Taisha Shrine, the route to the station is the same as the one mentioned above.
After exiting Gion-Shijo Station, head south along Kawabata Street, then towards Shijo Street/Prefectural Road 186.
In about 1 minute, you’ll reach Shijo-Keihanmae Bus Stop. The advantage of this route is its easy transfer!

The total travel time is around 40 minutes, and the fare is 440 yen.

Taxi

How to Get to Kiyomizu-dera Using Taxi
DistanceApproximately 5 km.
Fare2,500-3,000 yen
DurationApproximately 20 minutes

Conclusion

Kyoto’s must-visit spot is Kiyomizu-dera Temple.
It’s incredibly popular, easy to reach, and surrounded by delicious restaurants, making it the perfect destination for your trip.
If you’re planning a trip to Kyoto, be sure to explore Kiyomizu-dera!

コメントする

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 が付いている欄は必須項目です